The History of the Early American Industries Association

Plimoth Plantation

Our Purpose:  The Early American Industries Association Preserves and Presents Historic Trades, Crafts, and Tools and Interprets Their Impact on Our Lives  The Early American Industries Association was founded in 1933 in the midst of the Great Depression.  The following is a summary of the early history of our organization. Loring McMillen who was Vice-President […]

EAIA’s 2018 Annual Meeting – Save the Dates!

Steam Engine at the National Museum of Industrial History

The 2018 EAIA Annual Meeting Will Be Wednesday, May 23rd thru Saturday, May 26th, 2018 – Save the Dates! Come and join us at the Early American Industries Association’s 85th Anniversary in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania and we’ll celebrate in style as we experience the industrial and cultural history of Pennsylvania’s Lehigh Valley and the equally fascinating […]

A Picture Gallery From Old Sturbridge Village – The 2017 EAIA Annual Meeting

Covered Bridge at OSV

What a fantastic 2017 Early American Industries Association meeting at Old Sturbridge Village, Massachusetts on May 17th thru May 20th!  We enjoyed a beautiful venue, sunny warm weather, amazing displays, wonderful lectures, workshops, auctions, great demonstrations, and fascinating displays.  We learned, had fun, relaxed, renewed old friendships and made new ones. We savored wonderful food […]

Metal Mouths and Faucet Handles

Stanley model Shop Planes with Metal Mouths, Title Image

From its inception the Stanley Rule & Level Company was very attentive to its customers needs and desires.  Their salesmen were instructed to listen carefully to comments and suggestions from their customers about the tools they manufactured and bring that information back to the foremen in the shop.  Because of the nature of the “inside […]

Panic, Patents, and Liberty Bell Planes

Model Shop #104 Liberty Bell Smooth Plane

This post is a bit longer than those I’ve written in the past, but I hope you’ll enjoy the story that’s in here about another interesting plane from the Stanley Model Shop. 1873 to 1879 were tough years for the Stanley Rule & Level Company as well as the rest of the U.S. economy.  The […]

#120 Model Shop Prototype Block Plane; From Evolution to Production

Stanley #120 Prototype and Stanley #120 Type 1 Title Image

It’s late in the year 1875, and Justus Traut and the men in his shop at Stanley Rule & Level Company are still diligently working on a cutter adjustment mechanism for the Stanley #110 block plane. Traut and Henry Richards, one of the “mechanics” working in Traut’s  shop, produced the block plane prototype shown in […]

Justus Traut’s Early Adjustable #110 Block Planes

Model Shop #110 Adjustable Block Plane Attributed to Justus Traut

As I told you in my last post, Stanley Rule & Level Company introduced the #110 non-adjustable block plane sometime in 1874.  The plane was derived from Justus Traut’s patent No. 159,865 granted on February 16, 1875.  Traut had sent in his patent application on November 13, 1874 at about the time Stanley started advertising […]

Copy Cat Blocks and One From the Model Shop

Bailey Victor Block Plane, Holly Block Plane, Traut #110 Block Plane 980x550

On July 6, 1852, Birdsill Holly was granted Patent No. 9,094 for a cast iron bench plane.  In addition to his cast iron bench planes he produced and sold two models of a cast iron block plane.  There are no individual patents for these block planes and they were manufactured for only about 8 years […]

“What Goes Around Comes Around”

Model Shop Aluminum Block Planes

Aluminum Block Planes from the Stanley Model Shop In the first couple of decades of the 20th century, aluminum became available to manufacturers at a reasonable cost. Although aluminum comprises 8.2% of the earth’s crust, making it the most abundant metal in nature, it never occurs in its free form.  In 1825, Hans Christian Oersted, […]

Stanley Model Shop #278 Rabbet and Filletster Plane

980x550 #278 and #278 Stanley Prototype

The Stanley Rule & Level Company was always interested in providing its customers with the tools they wanted.  They were very adept at bringing to market variations of their tools to satisfy the demands of as many workmen as possible.  They listened to their customers and often incorporated their suggestions into the tools they produced.  […]